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Posts Tagged: property

Proposals to Ban Gazumping and Gazundering

Posted by on October 30th 2017 in Blog Posts, Property

More Certainty for Home Buyers and Sellers: Proposals to Ban Gazumping and Gazundering

Gazumping: where sellers accept a higher offer, having already accepted another buyer’s offer.

Gazundering: where homebuyers threaten not to complete a sale unless money is knocked off the price at the last minute.

Currently, buyers and sellers alike can do nothing to stop either Gazumping or Gazundering hindering a property sale, which causes uncertainty and leads to wasted costs on both sides of the transaction.  

Paula Higgins, chief executive of the Homeowners Alliance said:

“Gazundering, gazumping, collapsing chains, and one in three sales falling through. It takes too...

New CNG Form For Land Registry

Posted by on October 4th 2017 in Blog Posts, Property

New CNG Form For Land Registry

The Land Registry has introduced a form (form CNG) to enable the registered proprietor of a property to update their name on the register following a change of gender. There is no cost for making the application however the form must be accompanied by some form of evidence – a gender recognition certificate, new birth certificate or a UK medical practitioner’s letter. If the proprietors chosen evidence is the practitioner’s letter then it must confirm that they have lived in their new gender for two years and are now known as the name specified on the form.   There are procedural...

The Launch of the New Business and Property Court of England & Wales

Posted by on September 29th 2017 in Employment

The Launch of the New Business and Property Court of England & Wales

The Business and Property Courts of England & Wales will be launched on 02 October 2017. The new court will comprise the following:

  • Commercial Court
  • Technology and Construction Court
  • Courts of the Chancery Division
  • Insolvency and Companies Court
  • Admiralty Court
  • Business list
  • Financial list
  • Competition list
  • Intellectual Property List
  • Property Trust and Probate List; and
  • Revenue List.

In addition to London there will be 5 main regional centres comprising of Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds and Cardiff. Users will be asked to identify which centre they wish to issue proceedings in.   This will enhance the connection between London and the regions with the mantra that...

The Defective Premises Act 1972 in Practice

Posted by on August 23rd 2017 in Blog Posts, Property

The Defective Premises Act 1972 in Practice

The Defective Premises Act 1972 (“the 1972 Act”) charges landlords with a duty of care to anyone who it might be reasonable to expect would be affected by defects in the state of its premises.  The duty applies if the tenancy imposes an obligation on the landlord to maintain and repair the premises or if the tenancy reserves the landlord the right to enter the premises to carry out repair. 

In Dodd v Raebarn Estates Ltd and others [2017] EWCA Civ 439 the tenant’s visitor, Mr Dodd, fell down the stairs from the first floor flat to the ground floor. He...

The Rise of Property Fraud - How Can Home Owners Protect Themselves?

Posted by on July 5th 2017 in Blog Posts, Commercial Property , Property

The Rise of Property Fraud - How Can Home Owners Protect Themselves?

During the last few years, the real estate sector has seen a rise in property fraud.  Property is usually the most valuable asset people own and it is a clear target for fraudsters who could attempt to sell or mortgage a home.  The rise of fraud has mostly been down to identity theft with devastating effects.

You are more at risk if:

  • You rent out your property
  • You live overseas
  • Your property is left empty for long periods
  • Your property isn’t mortgaged
  • Your property is not registered

In order to protect your property from being fraudulently sold or mortgaged, the following steps should be taken, even if...

Notice to Quit: The Devil Really is in the Detail

Posted by on July 3rd 2017 in Blog Posts, Conveyancing

Notice to Quit: The Devil Really is in the Detail

The first few pages of a properly drafted lease should identify the address of the parties, and include express provision for the service and deemed service of notices, including where notices must be served.  One would imagine in a lease that did not contain express words to the contrary, that it would not be unreasonable to use the addresses detailed in the lease to contact the parties.  What address however should be used if you do know of an alternative address?  This was the question that faced the Court of Appeal in  Grimes v The Trustees of the Essex Farmers...

The Pitfalls of Property Guardians

Posted by on April 26th 2017 in Blog Posts, Conveyancing

The Pitfalls of Property Guardians

Due to the rise of so called “professional squatters”, property guardians are often enlisted to live in property, which would otherwise be left empty. Guardians are offered low rent accommodation, their presence deterring squatters, arson and vandalism. To reflect a temporary living arrangement, licences rather than a lease is given. Licences are granted as licences are believed to not offer the tenant the same protections of a lease. Recently, however the decision by the Bristol County Court in Camelot Property Management v Roynon (unreported) has shown that property guardianship schemes may not be a risk free temporary arrangement for landowners!

Bristol...

E-Conveyancing - a Move with Times?

Posted by on April 26th 2017 in Blog Posts, Conveyancing

E-Conveyancing - a Move with Times?

A Digital signature has made its first appearance in a residential property transaction.

An electronic signature was used for the first time to exchange contracts in a residential property transaction on the 6th April 2017 at exactly 15:39. This marked the beginning of E-conveyancing and potentially laid down the first brick for the path of the future. 

Solicitors acting on both sides uploaded the agreed contract onto one of the registered secure systems, which was then sent to the respective seller and purchaser to electronically sign. The system was then able to confirm that the document was read and signed,...

What Makes a House a House?

Posted by on April 17th 2017 in Blog Posts, Property

What Makes a House a House?

In Grosvenor (Mayfair) Estate v Merix International Ventures Ltd & Another [2017] EWCA Civ 190 the Court of Appeal had to consider what makes a property a house.  If a property is a “house” under the Leasehold Reform Act 1967 (the ’67 Act), then a tenant may be entitled to purchase the freehold or extend their lease. The Court had to apply the law to the facts to determine the entitlement of the tenant.

Certain criteria must be fulfilled to entitle a tenant to enfranchise or extend. The tenant must hold a long leasehold of the property (more than 21 years)...

Can you Enjoy an Easement to use a Golf Course, Swimming Pool and Tennis Court ?

Posted by on April 15th 2017 in Blog Posts, Property

In the case of Regency Villas Title Ltd v others v Diamond Resorts (Europe) Ltd and another [2017] EWCA Civ 238 (“Regency”), the Court of Appeal considered whether the right granted to use a golf course, swimming pool and tennis court was capable of forming a legal easement.   Regency explored the test established in Re Ellenborough Park  [1955] EWCA Civ 4 where the Court of Appeal had to consider the validity of easements, of various kinds, to enjoy recreational facilities.

Regency Villas Title Ltd was the freehold owner of Elham House which lies in the middle...

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